CSIS: History Lessons for the Arctic
Dec
19
9:00am 9:00am

CSIS: History Lessons for the Arctic

The emergence of a rapidly transforming Arctic Ocean challenges policymakers as the region holds both great economic promise and fraught environmental change, effectively making the Arctic a modern-day policy laboratory where important lessons for resolving international maritime issues should be better understood. A new CSIS report, History Lessons for the Arctic: What International Maritime Disputes Tell Us about a New Ocean, seeks to draw important historical lessons for the future of Arctic maritime governance by using three international maritime dispute case studies ranging from creating marine protected areas to ensuring freedom of navigation and resolving overlapping maritime claims in the Barents and Ross Seas, as well as the Turkish Straits (the 1920 Spitsbergen Treaty, the 1936 Montreux Convention, and the 1959 Antarctic Treaty and Subsequent Antarctic Treaty System). Please join us for a discussion of history and its modern, geostrategic applications in the Arctic.

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Waging Insurgent Warfare: Lessons from the Vietcong to the Islamic State
Dec
16
1:00pm 1:00pm

Waging Insurgent Warfare: Lessons from the Vietcong to the Islamic State

Since the end of World War II, there have been 181 insurgencies around the world. In fact, most modern warfare occurs in the form of insurgencies, including in Iraq, Syria, Libya, Afghanistan, and Ukraine. In spite of their prevalence, however, we still know relatively little about how insurgencies function. With more than three dozen violent insurgencies taking place today, Seth G. Jones offers detailed insights into the dynamics and operations of such groups.

This book talk will examine the history of insurgent warfare and discuss implications for today, particularly for such groups as the Islamic State. In Waging Insurgent Warfare, Jones brings together examples from current events and recent history to identify the factors that contribute to the rise of an insurgency, the key components involved in conducting an insurgency – from selecting an organizational structure to securing aid from an outside source – and the elements that contribute to the end of insurgencies. Through examining the strategies, tactics, and campaigns that insurgents use, as well as how these factors relate to each other on the ground, he offers a comprehensive understanding of the ways in which insurgent groups function.

Seth G. Jones is Director of the International Security and Defense Policy Center at the RAND Corporation as well as an Adjunct Professor at Johns Hopkins University's School for Advanced International Studies (SAIS). He served in several positions at U.S. Special Operations Command, including as a plans officer and advisor to the commanding general for U.S. Special Operations Forces in Afghanistan (Combined Forces Special Operations Component Command-Afghanistan).

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Future Foundry: A New Strategic Approach for Military-Technical Advantage
Dec
14
9:00am 9:00am

Future Foundry: A New Strategic Approach for Military-Technical Advantage

Future Foundry builds on two years of research by the CNAS team describing the challenges faced by the global defense industry in Creative Disruption and considering the Department of Defense's attempts to maintain military-technical superiority in Beyond Offset. Through these prior projects, CNAS has helped establish a clear case that the DoD and its industry partners must adapt in order to cope with a changing threat landscape, the decentralization of innovation, and the democratization of technology. 

The DoD must develop and implement a new strategic approach to generate and maintain technological superiority; one that fundamentally shifts the basis of the DoD's advantage by creating an elegant alignment between the nation's strategic needs, available technologies, and the various business models through which the DoD develops and fields military capabilities. The Future Foundry Report provides a positive vision for how the Department of Defense can establish such an approach to generate military-technical advantage, drive institutional reform, and collaborate more effectively with a wide range of industry partners. 

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